Thursday, July 21

Breakfast

7:00 – 8:00 am, Grand Ballroom Foyer

Announcements

8:00 – 8:15 am, Grand Ballroom A

Presidential Address

8:15 – 8:45 am | Grand Ballroom A

Break

8:45 pm – 9:00 am

Session 01: Keynote

Session 01: Keynote

Over 40 years ago, Steve ‘Spaz’ Williams was at the bleeding edge of both the theoretical concepts and practical applications of computer graphics. This keynote will discuss the premise that anything you can imagine, given enough time is inevitable. Beginning with his work on the Abyss and continuing with Terminator 2, computer graphics began to factor into the design and development of film. But it was the graphics in Jurassic Park that would have been impossible without him and his rebellious team pushing the limits and changing the industry forever. From resurrecting dinosaurs in the 90’s to today’s state-of-the-art technologies bringing back deceased actors and even creating new ones, the recurring theme will be that imagination inevitably triumphs. Having conquered the realm of pixels, we are well on our way to directly interfacing with the visual cortex…or is it possible that we have already arrived?

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Coffee Break

10:00 pm – 10:30 am

Session 02: Demarest Anatomy Lecture

Session 02: Demarest Anatomy Lecture

“Lessons through the Lens” – How Learners are Being Brought Virtually into the Cadaver Laboratory

The cadaver laboratory continues to hold its place as one of the most sought-after spaces for learners to engage with the cadaveric donor.  Despite the abundance of commercially created technological tools and anatomy teaching and learning options, learners at all levels of competency value the authenticity that dissection and the dissected cadaver provides. While there are many approaches to learning human anatomy in the laboratory, two fundamental elements of the cadaveric experience are essential for a meaningful learning experience, (1) good visualization and (2) anatomical context.  In the digital space, anatomical content capture is charting a way forward to elevate cadaveric anatomy onto a platform through which laboratory capabilities can extend across a learner base that no longer requires presence within the traditional classroom.  In the Department of Clinical Anatomy, Mayo Clinic, a multidisciplinary team of experiential learning strategists, data capture experts, anatomy professors and clinicians are exploring ways in which cadaveric anatomy can be maximized to authenticate the learner experience.  The aim of this presentation is to share two consecutive years of experience using a technologically centric curriculum embedded in principles of experiential learning, lessons learned and way forward.

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Network/Break

11:30 pm – 11:45 am

Business Lunch Meeting

11:145 am – 1:30 pm, Grand ballroom A

Network/Break

1:30 pm – 1:45 pm

Session 03: Brödel Memorial Lecture

Session 03: Brödel Memorial Lecture

Under normal physiological conditions, the functions of many organs depend on the continuous destruction and renewal of their cells. Equally remarkable is the fact that the adult tissues and organs of many organisms can be fully restored after amputation. In fact, metazoans have evolved a series of renewal and repair mechanisms to respond to both trauma and normal wear and tear. Such mechanisms are under tight regulatory control such that the form and function of tissues, organs, and systems can be maintained throughout life. As important as repair and restoration are to the survival of multicellular organisms, we know little about how these processes are effected and regulated at the cellular and molecular levels. Here, I will discuss how the study of two research organisms, the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea and the African killifish Nothobranchius furzeri is beginning to shed light on the way adult animals regulate tissue homeostasis and the replacement of body parts lost to injury.

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Coffee Break

2:45 pm – 3:00 pm

Session 04: History

Session 04: History

This talk aims to explore the history of medical illustration regarding its role in anatomical education, medical school development, and visual diversity. Examination of medical illustration’s social and educational context will occur using a few historical figures and conclude with a contemporary analysis of visual diversity within skin tone, habitus, ability, and age within anatomical atlases and imagery.

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Network/Break

4:00 pm – 4:15 pm

Roundtable Sessions

4:15 - 5:00 pm

Grand Ballroom A

Moderators: Wes Price and Nick Klein

Awards Celebration

Grand Ballroom A

 

Cash Bar | 6:30 – 7:00 pm

Awards Presentations | 7:00 – 8:00 pm

Salon Networking | 8:00 – 9:00 pm