CEU’s: 0.1 Business

 

Alison Doubleday 

What is it about what you have created that makes it effective? The visualization work you do can have a significant, measurable impact on biomedical sciences education. However, besides translating complex information into visual form, the goal should also be to assess its impact. The way we depict anatomical structures and physiological processes has changed over the past few decades. Educators have moved from chalkboard, slides and textbook illustrations to 3D models and digital applications, digital textbooks and digital dissection tables. Can visualizing biomedical concepts and information in a new way allow students to learn more efficiently, effectively, or differently? In addition to student performance, biomedical science educators are increasingly interested in how visual resources impact learner satisfaction, student engagement, usability, efficiency, collaboration, study habits and clinical application. This presentation will address assessing the impact of biomedical visualization resources by examining the drivers of innovation: technology, clinical medicine, and the biomedical curriculum. The ever-expanding nature of the profession’s work demands that you consider not only how best to visualize biomedical content but how to assess its impact. This is essential to ensuring that real needs are met, and the visualization will be effective and likely to be integrated into the existing curriculum.

 

[Keywords for this session: impact assessment, learning outcomes, learning context] 

Alison Doubleday

Alison Doubleday is an associate professor in the Department of Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences at the University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Dentistry where she teaches human gross anatomy and embryology to first-year dental students. An anthropologist by training, Alison started her journey in the academic world as an archaeologist. After accepting a teaching assistant position for the undergraduate human anatomy course at Indiana University, Alison discovered her love for anatomy and developed a true passion for teaching. In addition to teaching anatomy, Alison is involved in curriculum design and development within the UIC College of Dentistry. Her current research interests include investigations of the role that technology plays in shaping classroom interactions and collaboration.