Tech Showcase

Molecular Illustration Made Simple(r)?

Molecular Illustration Made Simple(r)?

Kevin Brennan

Molecular Visualization can be a complicated and expensive endeavor, often utilizing 3d animation and rendering software with a steep learning curve. However, it is possible to create accurate and compelling molecular illustrations without 3d animation software. Using Visual Molecular Dynamics (and an investigation of the Header section of a PDB file) you can create a variety of representations by isolating different regions or structures of interest. In this presentation Kevin will demonstrate how to set up and create multiple renders for control of ambient occlusion, specular highlights, base diffuse color, as well as generate masks for compositing in Photoshop or After Effects.

Kevin Brennan is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Biomedical Visualization Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Prior to joining the UIC faculty he worked at Argosy Medical | Visible Body as a medical animator and the senior content developer for the award winning Visible Body App, MOA and physiology animations, and interactive surgical simulators. He earned his BA in Biology from Illinois Wesleyan University in 2003 and completed his MS in Biomedical Visualization from UIC in 2005. He currently teaches classes in the areas of: animation, molecular visualization, Particle Flow, rendering using VRay, Arnold, and Redshift, compositing in After Effects, and serves on several research committees. Kevin also works with the Journal of Biocommunication as a Board Member and Co-Editor.


Data-Driven Anatomical Research Models for 3D Printing: Overview and Case Study

Data-Driven Anatomical Research Models for 3D Printing: Overview and Case Study

Lydia Gregg, CMI

Clinical and basic science researchers face challenges in scaling potential treatments from animal models to human subjects. The use of animal models in research incurs high costs and can be time and resource intensive due to the need to follow regulatory guidelines. High-resolution 3D-printed models can aid in scaling up new treatments from animal experiments to clinical use by providing ways to study certain variables that change with larger subjects. These 3D models can also reduce or replace the use of animal models for certain types of experiments including anatomical feasibly studies and radiological research.   The creation of tailored, data-driven models for research studies poses unique challenges in the design of internal cavities and delicate parts. The creator must ensure accuracy while segmenting radiological datasets that are often relatively small. This Techniques Showcase exhibit will discuss and demonstrate steps for model creation using the example of a cerebrospinal fluid flow model used in a feasibility study. This topic encompasses the program themes, “Understanding medical imaging,” and “Visualizing medical and scientific data.” Continuing education topics include both art and biomedical subject matter. 

Co-Authors:

Rohit K. Srivastava
Miroslaw Janowski

Lydia Gregg is a Certified Medical Illustrator and Assistant Professor in The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Division of Interventional Neuroradiology with a joint faculty appointment in the Department of Art as Applied to Medicine. She and her husband, Fabian de Kok-Mercado, also own and operate ProAtlantal Studio, a medical illustration business. Lydia received her Master of Arts in Medical and Biological Illustration from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 2007.


Modern Compositing Workflows

Modern Compositing Workflows

Michael Hickman

I’m going to talk about several animation compositing production practices to get the most speed and highest quality color fidelity out of your animation production. I’ll cover setting up your compositing for linear workflow and show why it’s helpful, especially with 4k projects. Since most people likely use After Effects, I’ll do much of the demo with it and include tips on how to get better performance from it for larger scale projects. I’ll also demonstrate some of AE’s shortcomings regarding effects and 3rd party plugins as they relate to linear workflow. I also want to introduce Blackmagic Fusion as a perhaps better solution in many compositing cases that won’t make you dependent on 3rd party plugins like AE often does. If you work with multiple team members, occasionally need to reverse engineer your composites from long ago, and would like a faster and more cost-effective multi-machine rendering capability than After Effects with plugins, I’ll show why you should consider Fusion. Other things I’ll touch on are achieving better final video compression output, combining DOF with motion blur in post, setting color management so your projects look the same on different types of monitors, and more if time permits.

Michael Hickman is a senior medical animator at Barrow Neurological Institute since 2002. He earned a Bachelor’s degree from Arizona State University specializing in 3D animation and graphics. Some of his primary roles at Barrow are providing technical direction, creating tools and efficient animation production workflows, and supporting team members with IT and tech support. He has worked on over 1000 animation projects and nearly as many illustrations for neurosurgical journals, books, multimedia projects, websites, television shows, and surgical hardware visualizations.


Molecular Maya (mMaya)

Molecular Maya (mMaya)

Gaël McGill, PhD

This Tech Showcase will give participants an overview of the existing Molecular Maya (mMaya) toolkit for molecular modeling and animation and, in particular, feature the most recently released RNA and Rigging & Dynamics kits. The presentation will combine case studies with live software demos and showcase a range of advanced production examples created with the software. The goal of mMaya is to enable the rapid and intuitive creation of structurally accurate and simulation-ready macromolecular models and should therefore be of relevance and interest to anyone creating static or animated molecular imagery. Participants will also be introduced to the new training resources available on Clarafi to support their exploration and use of mMaya.

Dr. Gaël McGill is faculty and Director of Molecular Visualization at the Center for Molecular and Cellular Dynamics at Harvard Medical School where his teaching and research focuses on visualization design and assessment methods in science education. He is also founder & CEO of Digizyme, Inc. (www.digizyme.com) a firm dedicated to the visualization and communication of science. Dr. McGill recently co-authored and served as digital director for E.O. Wilson’s Life on Earth iBooks biology textbook. He is the creator of the scientific visualization online community portal Clarafi.com (originally molecularmovies.com), the Molecular Maya (mMaya) software toolkit and has contributed to leading Maya and ZBrush textbooks for Wiley/SYBEX Publishing. Dr. McGill was also a board member of the Vesalius Trust and remains an advisor to several biotechnology and device companies. After his B.A. summa cum laude in Biology, Music, and Art History from Swarthmore College, and Ph.D. at Harvard Medical School as a Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Sandoz Pharmaceuticals fellow, Dr. McGill completed his postdoctoral work at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute studying tumor cell apoptosis and melanoma.


Articulate Storyline: Interactives Made Easy

Articulate Storyline: Interactives Made Easy

Amy Sojka

Articulate Storyline is a perfect tool for medical illustrators who want to develop engaging interactive modules for websites, or online learning management systems without having to learn coding. It is one of the most popular eLearning authoring tools. The main reason for its popularity is its approachable interface and the fact that it allows for creating complex interactives, such as quizzes, games, drop-down menus, and click-and-reveal buttons, in an intuitive and straightforward way.

Amy Sojka is an award winning author and medical illustrator. She is the lead eLearning designer for Medline University, a provider of continuing education for healthcare providers owned by Medline Industries Inc. Amy uses her passion for medical art, anatomy and interactives to create engaging clinical content for nurses and other healthcare professionals. Amy received her Masters of Science in Biomedical Visualization from the University of Illinois at Chicago. Medline is the largest privately held manufacturer and distributor of medical supplies uniquely positioned to provide products, education and support across the continuum of care. Medline is made up of clinicians, researchers, engineers, financial experts and 1,200 direct sales representatives with outstanding expertise.


Animating in Adobe Photoshop

Animating in Adobe Photoshop

Natalie Yoshioka, Angela Gao

Photoshop is a widely utilized application by many medical artists to create static, 2D artwork. This demonstration introduces and explores the capabilities of the motion workspace to create movement with frame-by-frame animation techniques that can be applied to gifs, motion graphics, animated illustrations or infographics, and web development. Expand your technical capabilities and broaden the variety of media that you can produce with just Photoshop.

Natalie Yoshioka, MS, graduated in 2018 from the Biomedical Visualization Graduate Program (BVIS) at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Natalie became interested in animation during undergraduate education and recognizes the benefit of motion to highlight an area of focus and draw attention to key elements. She is passionate about anatomy and medical education and believes that web-based interactives provide a key avenue to communicate science to a broad range of audiences.

Angela Gao graduated in 2018 from the Biomedical Visualization program at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Her love of animation came from watching an astronomical amount of cartoons as a kid (and as an adult). She appreciates good motion design and has a particular fondness for hand-drawn frame-by-frame animation.


Spiders from Space: Processing Scan Data from Artec Studio in Zbrush

Spiders from Space: Processing Scan Data from Artec Studio in Zbrush

Wes Price, Xochitl Vinaja, Quade Paul

Optimizing and transforming scan data into didactic 3D models has never been easier. During each session we will demonstrate how scan data of anatomical specimens compiled in Artec Studio can be processed with ZBrush to create versatile assets for your illustration practice.

Wes Price earned his Master of Science Degree in medical illustration from the Medical College of Georgia and has over 20 years of professional experience in illustration and education. For 12 years he served as an Associate Professor at the Art Institute of Colorado, where he was named “Faculty of the Year” in 2011. He enjoys experimenting with 3D illustration techniques using photogrammetry, digital sculpting, 3D scanning and 3D printing. Currently he is a medical illustrator and faculty for the Department of Anatomical Sciences at St. George’s University School of Medicine, in Grenada, West Indies.

Kevin Eliott graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Materials and Product Studies from the University of Oregon in 2016. A long time lover of 3D modeling and printing, he started with Digital Scan 3D in early 2017, and has pioneered many new techniques in the 3D scanning field. He is now a Senior Scanning Specialist, and has traveled across the country and internationally scanning for a variety of clients including Nike, Intel, Boeing, Adidas, Daimler and many more. Most recently he brought 3D scanning technology to Grenada, West Indies to help reverse engineer plastinated anatomical specimens for the Department of Anatomical Sciences at St. George’s University.

Quade Paul graduated with a bachelor’s degree in fine arts with minors in art history and anatomy from Colorado State University, and then earned an MA from the Art as Applied to Medicine program at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Over the past twenty years Quade has run Echo Medical Media, an illustration, animation, and 3D modeling and printing company for the medical and scientific community. Although he still spends a great deal of time drawing, painting, and sculpting traditionally, the majority of his commercial work now involves using ZBrush and Cinema4D to create illustrations and animations for a variety of clients. One of his favorite 3d sculpting projects is a series of Cambrian fossil reconstructions that he developed in collaboration with the Smithsonian Institution. He is lucky enough to live and work in the front range of the Colorado Rocky Mountains, where the natural beauty of the surroundings is a constant inspiration.