Jodie Jenkinson  // Michael Corrin 

Among the greatest research challenges of the 21st century, is the ability to understand and make use of the vast amounts of experimental, simulated, and observational data generated from a multitude of sources. As medical illustrators it is our role to develop visualization strategies that help audiences make meaning of data and gain insight into complex phenomena. Whether the representations we create are driven by data (in the form of a simulation) or informed by data (as in a narrative or visual explanation) visualizations have become an integral part of research, education, and outreach. While there has been enthusiastic adoption of scientific visualization across various domains, there is currently no system in place for vetting the credibility of these representations. Presenting citations linked with visualizations has several benefits. The creator of the visualization receives greater credibility. A viewer is able to determine the data behind elements and also have a list of resources for further investigation and learning. Different visualizations of similar subjects could more objectively be compared, and newer versions could be produced as further information is discovered.

Jodie Jenkinson, PhD

Jodie Jenkinson, PhD

Jodie Jenkinson is an Associate Professor of Biomedical Communications at University of Toronto (Canada) and principle investigator of the Science Visualization Lab (www.sciencevis.ca). She holds a PhD in Education (University of Toronto), specializing in cognition and learning, with a focus on technology in education. Her research focuses on the role that visual representations play in learning. This includes investigation along various lines of inquiry including the efficacy of visual media within different learning contexts, the design of visual representations for optimal impact, and the development of standards of visual communication in the scientific visualization community.

Michael Corrin, CMI

Michael Corrin, CMI

Michael Corrin teaches in the University of Toronto’s Biomedical Communications graduate program. He has worked at Toronto’s Hospital For Sick Children (SickKids) as part of the About Kids Health (http://www. aboutkidshealth.ca) team, and has developed web-based professional education resources as a member of Toronto General Hospital’s Perioperative Interactive Education (PIE) group; he continues to collaborate with the latter, developing and evaluating a low fidelity web-based trans-esophageal echocardiography simulator. His current interests include paddling in boreal lakes, and developing better digital tools to help illustrators engage in more rich and fruitful feedback processes.